Quick snaps from a trip to DC (especially Museum of the Bible)

Quick trip to DC on Thursday, especially for the 15th-anniversary gala of The American Conservative, which I often enjoy reading and am happy to support – also visited the Museum of the Bible and (very quickly) a couple other places.  Below, a few snaps.

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A between-the-clouds departure from Lansing (American CRJ-145), with rain in the area.

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And a little over an hour later, I’m in DC.  Dropped my luggage off at my hotel near Dupont Circle.

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Though it was about three miles away, decided just to walk to the Museum of the Bible, see some sites – DC neighborhoods are nice.

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This place seemed vaguely familiar somehow.  Neat to see all the history in DC, actually.

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Made it!  Bible museums in DC have more security that Capitol buildings in Michigan, true story.

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Of course I first drifted into the “History of the Bible” section which had many ancient documents (some not exactly Bible) – this is a cuneiform tablet with much of the Epic of Gilgamesh on it, circa 1500 BC from the Iraq area.  Neat.

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This is a probably-3rd-century AD Greek papyrus manuscript with Psalm 109 and the beginning of Psalm 110 (written by a different scribe, note the handwriting gets larger).  I was generally impressed with how well scribe-made materials were written – straight lines, steady handwriting, they almost looked printed.

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A ~1470 AD compilation of the writings of Cyprian – again just impressive scribal work, that’s handwriting you’re looking at.

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A 15th century manuscript containing writings from Jerome (who lived about 1000 years before).

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This an illustrated prayer book made for Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire, early 16th century.  Very pretty.

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Early 15th century, an illuminated copy of the New Testament of the first complete English translation of the Bible… Middle English though, so take a look and see how much you can read!

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A 1524 German translation of the New Testament, done by Martin Luther.  Still rather amazing Luther did the translation in about a year while in hiding at the Wartburg Castle.

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And this is a Latin Bible signed by Martin Luther.  It is unclear why he signed it.

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And here a Tyndale New Testament from 1552. the first *printed* English Bible.  The English seems a bit more readable to me!

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Here is a wider shot – they had a room with a Bible printed in every language a Bible (or portion thereof) exists.  Neat idea I thought.

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A 1587 English translation of the Institutes of the Christian Religion, by John Calvin, printed in London.

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A microfiche “Lunar Bible”, taken to the Moon by Apollo 14.

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And my last photo from the Museum of the Bible – actually a second edition of Newton’s Principia, printed 1713.  They also had a section on the “Impact of the Bible”, which included a section about science, where this was found.

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And then, because I had a little time left before I needed to return to my hotel, I very quickly stopped in the Air and Space Museum.  I had been there before, but I was really struck by just how gosh darn big objects like the Lunar Module mock-up were.

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And similarly for this Skylab module, though the interior was designed for people under six feet tall.

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After that, a quick zoom through the National Botanical Garden.

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And walking by the pool in front of the Capitol.

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Priorities.

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And then I quickly wandered into the National Art Gallery, and my I am glad I wandered up to the second floor, because it was not at all clear to me that almost everything was *up*!

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A Da Vinci had an omnipresent small crowd in front of it, grabbed a photo when I could.

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Pretty serious take on the resurrection there Giovanni, whew.

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And then my first ever visit to Shake Shack.

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Subway back to Dupont Circle – and, thankfully, the only WMATA escalator I used that was actually working.

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A bit later, the gala.  Keynote by Patrick Deneen.  Was pleased to sit at dinner between Casey Chalk (who writes many places, including TAC) and his wife (who used to be a Math teacher, so instant connection there!), and the parents of TAC executive director John Burtka, who live in Jackson, MI.  Quite the enjoyable dinner conversation.

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Event was at the Cosmos Club in DC – this used to be someone’s house.

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Music from a Catholic University of America quartet.

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And finally, heading home bright and early next morning on a Delta A320.  Fun trip.